Spot Mini robot dance

Boston Dynamics gets into the groove with this video of their Spot Mini quadruped, including some anthropomorphic robosexy moves that might tickle some public.

 

Another Spot Mini video, this one got more than 5 million hits since February. It is more in the Boston Dynamics tradition with a Skynet-like machine behaviour and robot abuse moments. 16000+ comments, largely about the themes mentioned above.

And The Things We Do… exhibition

After a frantic lead-up to the opening of the exhibition And The Things We Do in Azkuna Zentroa, Bilbao Spain, 11 Mudbots are pushing clay balls, largely helped by humans cranking them up.

 

 

The exhibition comprises a nice selection of robotic artworks by Carolin Liebl and Nicolas Schmid-Pfähler, Mari Velonaki, Petra Gemeinboeck and Rob Saunders, Robotlab, David Bowen as well as my good old friend Combover Jo, speaking Spanish for the occasion. The exhibition runs until 16 September 2018.

 

Introduction by the curators Rosa Casado and Mike Brooks: “The exhibition brings together a selection of major and influential contemporary artworks from within the fields of social robotics, bio electronics and artificial intelligence, that will together inhabit Azkuna Zentroa’s gallery, to create an evolving ecology of interactive and adaptably performative machines. With the artists who have worked with us over the past year to realise this collective of works, we have focused on how these strangely familiar yet extraordinary robots – through their behaviours, and their endeavours to adapt and function within their environment – might both reflect and respond to our own choices and experiences. Perhaps our meetings with them might open new perspectives onto the things we ourselves choose to do and not do, to make and not make happen, as together we navigate and shape the shared spaces we live in.”

 

Robots de barro coming soon in Bilbao

Nice day in Bilbao, Spain, a preparation trip for the Prototipoak exhibition who commissioned a new robotic installation featuring Mudbots – robots de barro.

Collected mud today in the Zorrozaure island, that used to be a very active industrial hub. Heavy metal doped bacteria…

 

Mud and kids and Microbits

I am in the middle of a new Lead Creative Schools project (I ran another one last year). Aimed at promoting a creative approach to teaching and life, the scheme allows a class in a primary school to work with a creative practitioner for approximately 10 teaching days on a made-to-measure project. This time I work with a year 6 class (10-11 year olds), combining creative technology and outdoors activities. We code Microbits and upcycle e-waste in the morning and build dens and mud batteries in the afternoon, a fine balance!

Electronic Wildertrees in Moscow

December 2017. The Garage contemporary arts centre invited me to wrek Russian e-waste with local participants and build some post-apocalypse trees as part of their 8th Art Experiment season. This year the theme was Laboratories of Earthly Survival. Curator Snejana Kratseva says:

 

“Each winter, Garage transforms its galleries into an experimental laboratory for art. Visitors of all ages are invited to participate in hands-on experiences with artists, as well as innovative creative collaborations between peers. Art Experiment is the flagship initiative of Garage Education and Public Programs and attracts students, parents, local residents, and Moscow visitors.

This year will be the eighth annual interactive initiative, focusing on science art and survival ethics. It will consist of hands-on experiments in “hacking” life sciences and equipping participants with skills in agricultural, biological, genetic as well as robo engineering, preparing kids and adults for an imaginary future after the world ended, cultivating a future generation of home-grown brand of “garage scientists” who will be able to not only to generate new inventions with low-fi materials but do so evaluating one’s ethical values with every new discovery.”

 

I knew there was little hope to get some exotic soviet era e-waste, and I was right. We got lots of Hewlett-Packard PCs, a crate of early 2000s Panasonic cameras and various other familiar consumer electronics items.

 

 

 

Other artists in the show were Anastasia Potemkina with an hydroponics installation for growing resilient, apocalypse resistant plants such as nettles, and the collective Where Dogs Run who had 20 odd live chicks providing the data for a vintage slide show and a great-looking electronic sculpture based on Dante’s inferno.

Art Experiment, Laboratories of Earthly Survival ran from December 19th 2017 to January 8th 2018.

Moscow

Moscow Sheremetyevo airport terminal last night. Temperature: 2°. Traffic into town: terrible (the sound of studded tyres on tarmac made the journey -somehow- more interesting).

 

I am setting up for a post apocalypse-themed wrekshop for the Art Experiment:Laboratories of Earthly Survival exhibition in the Garage contemporary art museum. My survival odds are very good if I trust the perfectly seared tuna I just ate in the museum restaurant…

 

Studded tyre sign, the letter sha

 

Vintage evil slave robots

I found this photo while tidying some drawers. These are two friends in robot costumes for a no-budget sci-fi pilot I shot in 1993 called Euronutrifood. They are supposed to be evil slave robots. Thanks again and respect to the ghosts in the machine: Raphaëlle Paupert-Borne and Matthieu Demouzon.

noosphere


 

Atmoshere, Geosphere, Biosphere, Noosphere: The sphere of human thought
now criss-crossing the world in binary strings
AD DA conversions analog to digital --> to? analog? data fit for human understanding

Power of the mud

mudMonsterBatts

Robotic artist Paul Granjon and bio-engineer Michka Melo are exploring the usability of microbial fuel cells for powering small robotic, sensing, interactive systems. Microbial fuel cells work by harnessing the electron-releasing capability of certain types of bacteria widely found in soil and mud. Paul and Michka have started working together on Microbial Fuel Cells, commonly known as Mud Batteries, in 2016.

 

Their batteries contain sediment mud from Barry Island, Wales. The mud is rich in  bacteria of the Shewanella (below) or Geobacter type, that deliver bioelectrogenesis (generation of electricity by living organisms).

 

shewanella2


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In September 2017 we showed our first working prototype in the Victoria and Albert Museum’s Digital Design Weekend in London, here is the link to fully detailed report on our experiments on microbial fuel cells before the event.

We had a great time, lots of questions and interest with amazed, amused, puzzled looks. Our bacteria worked hard and slow, 12 mud batteries powering 2 small robots for 10 seconds every 10 minutes. The robots run from a BBC Microbit each, with a small motor and an LED.

Thanks to Irini Papadimitriou for inviting us!

 

photo: Martine Goldschmidt-Clermont

 

 

powerMudDrawing

With support from FabCre8 @ Cardiff School of Art and Design

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